Alien’s Grin

  • In which I get teary over an archive of Byte magazine covers

    Sigh. I came across this archive of all the Byte magazine covers which some energetic soul has scanned. They go all the way back to the first issue in January 1977. Major flashback! Here’s the first one I bought at McGills Technical Books in Elizabeth Street, Melbourne: I’m pretty sure it cost me $AU4.50; about $18 or more in current dollars. I was a poor student and I agonized over spending that much.

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  • Mount Buffalo Chalet, 1952

    My Dad asked me to scan some photos taken when he was working as a maintenance carpenter at Mount Buffalo Chalet in 1952. He was employed by the Victorian Railway and in those days they owned and ran the Chalet. I guess that explains the holiday posters I used to see on the Red Rattlers. He was 21 and had just hooked up with a hot waitress who also worked there.

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  • Review Avantree Bluetooth Music Adapter Bttc 200x

    I’ve always had a love/hate relationship with Bluetooth. When it first came out in the nineties it looked like it would end the tangle of cables on my desktop, but the reality has fallen short. Apple have embraced Bluetooth for keyboards and mice, but the PC world is dominated by proprietary 2.4GHz dongles for wireless communication which gobble up a USB port before eventually getting lost. Unfortunately adoption has been slow so Bluetooth is often at a premium price compared to similar devices.

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  • Kids Cant Use Computers and This Is Why Consumer Electronics Sucks

    I was pointed to an article today called Kids Can’t Use Computers… And This Is Why It Should Worry You and it bugged me so much I had to respond at more length than was available in a FaceBook post.The article covers a few topics, some of which I agree with, but the general theme is “you don’t understand the inner workings of computers and I do, so you’re stupid”. There are (currently) 800 or more comments and growing so I assume it has gained some traction.

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© Ian Slinger, 2020